Sweet & Spicy Tangerine Glazed Grilled Chicken

Bobby Flay had me for a twofer — those amazing grilled potatoes are merely a side to complement this fabulous chicken. The chicken is seasoned in two ways: first a spice rub that forms a delicious crust while the chicken is grilling, and secondly the glaze which is sticky and sweet.

This balance of spicy crust + sweet glaze is absolutely the right way to do BBQ. I will be honest: my normal routine for grilled chicken breasts is this: salt, pepper, Italian seasoning out of a jar, olive oil, put on grill. That’s it. Simple and tasty.

But when you are looking for more. For that extra special something. For a break from the ordinary. This is it!

By the way, if you have trouble with grilled chicken breasts becoming too dry, check out my article on keeping chicken moist and tender, even when grilling.

With summer (i.e. barbecue season) coming to an end, I suggest you make this now. Otherwise you’ll regret it for the entire year.

Read the recipe and the rest of the post here…

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Genius Grilled Potatoes with Roasted Garlic-Herb Dressing

I might be in love with Bobby Flay. I have never tried a recipe of his that I didn’t fall in love with. (Except the ones that include cilantro, but that’s only because I hate the taste of it. Usually I just replace with another herb and still get stellar results.)

Why the word “genius” in the title of this post? Because of the two-step cooking process. See, Bobby realizes that if you just throw raw potatoes on the grill, the outside will burn before the inside is done cooking. So you will have a charred potato that is still raw in the middle. Bobby’s solution? Par-boil those babies before throwing them on the grill. That way, most of the cooking is done in a pot on the stove and the potatoes are grilled for only a few minutes to get some gorgeous grill marks and crust on the outside.

Finally, I just want to say, that my stick blender is amazing- with it, the dressing comes together in less than 10 seconds.

Attention: there are a lot of steps in this recipe and you will have too many dishes to do. My suggestion: pour yourself a glass of white wine, put on some music, and take the extra time. All those steps are vital to the final dish and you will be very happy that you didn’t take shortcuts.

By the way, the dressing recipes makes twice the amount you need for the potatoes. Go ahead and make all of it. Use it on your sandwich, as a dip for your fries, as a marinade for chicken. It’s versatile and it’s delicious.

Read the recipe and the rest of the post here…

BBQ Pulled Pork Sliders from a Yankee

So what if I’m a Yankee attempting some down-home Southern cooking? These babies are delicious. And they’re also a labor of love. Each step isn’t particularly hard, but it does take time. I made the BBQ sauce myself – about an hour of cooking time. I made a spice rub for the pork and let it penetrate the meat in the fridge overnight. I roasted that pork butt in the oven for hours. And honestly, I didn’t anticipate how long it took to pull apart a hunk of meat with two forks. I had to take a break and let my man do the rest of the work. But it all worked out — that meat was so tender I barely needed to chew.

Unfortunately, I didn’t have the luxury of dilly-dallying by a grill for hours on end so I had to bake this in the oven. Next time, I’ll see if I can get some friends to come out on a lazy Sunday afternoon and drink beers by the grill while a pork butt smokes in there to be ready in time for dinner.

And can we take a step to the side and speculate why it’s called pork butt? Because it comes from the shoulder part of the pig. The actual butt (as in, hindquarters) of a pig is a ham. Why do they call the shoulder a butt? It’s also sometimes known as Boston butt. It’s not like pigs come from Massachusetts. I just don’t get it.

And we’re back from the tangent. Let me tell you a couple of things that I learned while creating these succulent sliders.

1. You need a spice rub for your pork and it should contain some brown sugar. You should rub the meat with a thin coat of oil and then cover with the spice rub and let it hang out in the fridge overnight. This is because some spices are oil soluble so their flavor really shines when they’re sprinkled onto a layer of oil and it also helps them stick. The combo with brown sugar forms a gorgeous and flavorful crust all over the pork during cooking.

2. The pork needs to cook “low n slow” – at a low temperature for a really long time. This helps dissolve the fat and connective tissues to help the meat become fork tender. You should let it come to room temp before cooking and let it rest for at least 15 minutes after (covered in foil to keep it warm). These steps help the meat to keep its juices and stay moist and wonderful.

Read the recipes and the rest of the post here…